Japanese Cemeteries

 

You weren’t expecting a post like this, huh?

Japanese cemeteries are beautiful. They’re quite different to the western cemeteries that I’m definitely used to seeing, and I never really wondered about their significance when I was a child visiting Japan. The scenery of a cemetery here, well, makes death not seem so bad.

It’s not only the scenery, but the amount of thought and respect that is put into each visit – cleansing an ancestor’s grave, lighting an incense stick, leaving cordial gifts; all in remembrance and gratitude of them.

Of course, all graveyards are different, but 勝光院 (shoukouinn), is the name of the beautiful cemetery which has been partly captured below.

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shrine

 

If you are to ever come across a cemetery in Japan and wonder why people are cleaning a relative’s grave, lighting an incense stick (御線香 osenko), or are just interested in Japanese culture surrounding cemeteries, this blogpost may be interesting to you.

お墓 (おはか) ohaka  – a cemetery

お墓参り (おはかまえり) ohakamairi – the act of visiting a cemetery

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Japan: Artistry

It was beautiful. I had never thought that so much thought went into the art of tea

Since I arrived in Japan last week, I have experienced so much, yet, I feel this was one of the experiences that really encapsulated the essence of traditional Japanese culture and authenticity. 

As with most customs in Japan, deep thought is put into every step of almost anything you could think of. It is at times overwhelming, but extremely refreshing. 

Here are some photos I took!

   
    
    
 
Taken with the Nikon D7000